One lady’s bold jump into the Mystic River from a burning educate this week has grow to be symbolic of but any other nightmarish scene related to the MBTA.

But her resilience in the face of what Governor Charlie Baker called a “significant failure” has resonated with some T riders who watched online as the chaos spread out.

“Every time I’ve ever rode on the Orange Line, I actually have mentally prepared for the ‘educate’s on fire, now I need to jump off the bridge’ moment,” tweeted Rob Glover, a political technology professor at the University of Maine.

“Every time I’ve ever rode on the Orange Line, I actually have mentally prepared for the ‘educate’s on fire, now I need to jump off the bridge’ moment,” tweeted Rob Glover, a political technology professor at the University of Maine.

On Thursday morning, as smoke and flames engulfed part of an Orange Line train drawing close Somerville’s Assembly Station, commuters were sent right into a collective panic.

Amid the chaos of riders kicking thru home windows and leaping out of teach motors — all of the at the same time as struggling to realize what changed into going on — an unidentified female made the selection to jump from the bridge wherein the educate had stopped, down into the water underneath.

A fellow passenger recalled hearing every other individual shout on the lady not to make the leap. But whilst she appeared down, she could see the female already paddling to shore — a move, she stated, “made humans panic even more.”

When she was provided help from a municipal marine boat that “passed off to be within the river for training,” the lady widely wide-spread a existence jacket however denied extra help, Somerville Fire Chief Charles Breen informed the Globe.

Instead, she swam by way of herself to safety, and walked far from the modern in a string of incidents regarding the beleaguered transit authority.

“I was very scared for every person. We had no idea what was occurring. It become like pandemonium,” the female, who asked to remain anonymous, told the news station. “I assume I’m safer inside the water proper now than walking down the tracks.”

But her anonymity hasn’t stopped her from receiving tremendous interest, with some transit riders sympathizing with her unflinching dedication to get away.

“Who is that courageous woman, who jumps, refuses assistance, and [swims] on this river?” tweeted Reza Rawassizadeh, a professor at Boston University.

Grace Holley, a community planner, said while she rides the Orange Line, she regularly mentally prepares for a number of potential occasions. But having to leap into the water is a new one.

“Usually at the Orange Line I do a quick mental prep for following situations: a shooting, witnessing some thing violent/wanting to guard someone, teach falling off course on curvy bridge element by means of Charlestown,” she tweeted.

“She might be the identical lady from Boston who slipped among a train and the track some years ago and begged each person no longer to call an ambulance regardless of being critically injured,” tweeted one man or woman. “Tough as hell but a sad mirrored image on the price and country of healthcare.”

From deteriorating infrastructure to a passenger death and injuries due to mechanical and protection screw ups, the leap heard-spherical-the-Internet felt like the pinnacle in a string of incidents which have brought about oversight hearings and a federal investigation.